New Adventures in Copyright Enforcement @SXSW #SXSW

Friday, March 14 | 2:00PM – 3:00PM
New Adventures in Copyright Enforcement
Austin Convention Center | Room 17B | 500 E Cesar Chavez St

lthough debates about how to protect copyright online might seem so 2010, they certainly haven’t abated. The current conversations aren’t as contentious as the SOPA skirmishes, but that doesn’t necessarily mean consensus. Current attempts to address piracy are taking place outside of Congress, and include efforts to establish “best practices” between stakeholders. From the recently-minted Copyright Alert System to voluntary agreements meant to curb unauthorized activity within ad networks and payment processors, new experiments in rights protection abound. What’s the thinking behind the various approaches? What does a “win” look like, and what are the parameters for oversight? How can artists get involved?

MMODERATOR
Casey Rae
Interim Exec Dir – Future of Music Coalition

Sherwin Siy
VP, Legal Affairs- Public Knowledge

Jill Lesser
Exec Dir- Center For Copyright Information

David Lowery
Musician/Internet Content Provider – Cracker

DMCA : The Top 10 Stories on the Must Read List (Digital Millennium Copyright Act)

This week congress will hear testimony on the DMCA as part of it’s on going review of the Copyright Act.

Here’s 10 essential posts and articles to read to understand the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).

Google Receives Its 100 Millionth Piracy Notice. Nothing Changes… | DMN

Safe Harbor Not Loophole: Five Things We Could Do Right Now to Make the DMCA Notice and Takedown Work Better | Trichordist

Is this really what Congress had in mind when it created the DMCA? | Vox Indie

The DMCA is not an Alibi: The Googlization of Art and Artists  | MTP

The DMCA is Broken… | Trichordist

How DMCA Abuse Hurts Content Creators | Vox Indie

Copyright Erosion: How DMCA Misuse Became A Multimillion Dollar Shakedown and Income Transfer | MTP

Is it Time to Repair the DMCA? | Plagiarism Today

The Failure of the DMCA Notice and Takedown System | CPIP

The DMCA License? | AIMP

Worth Repeating : Copylike.Org Artists Rights Postcards

Music is Free!

We Do This For The Love

Pay Creators Like You Pay Everyone Else

It’s Not Stealing, Are You Sure?

Evil Corporations, We Don’t Like Them!

If You Like Open Source and Creative Commons

Defend Copyright.
It’s All We Have Left.
COPYLIKE.ORG

Jean Michel Jarre: ‘Don’t forget that us creators are the smart part in a smart phone | MTP

by Helienne Lindvall

At this week’s Midem music conference in Cannes, France, I sat down with electronic music pioneer Jean Michel Jarre, whose career as an artist and composer is now in its fifth decade, having broken through internationally with his groundbreaking Oxygene album in 1976. Last year, he took over the presidency of CISAC, the global body for authors’ societies, after the previous president, Robin Gibb, passed away – and so his Midem “visionary talk” went under the headline Fair Share for Creators.

Jarre:

“We should never forget that in the smartphone, the smart part is us creators. If you get rid of music, images, videos, words and literature from the smartphone, you just have a simple phone that would be worth about $50. Let’s accept that there’s a lot of innovation in the smartphone, so let’s add $100 for this innovation – the remaining $300-$400 of the price should go to us.

So we should sit down and talk to all the telephone companies and computer companies selling hardware, the companies carrying the content on the internet, such as Facebook and Google. We need each other, so at the end of the day we have to find the right partnership. We are talking about a business partnership, not a tax, and this shouldn’t affect the consumer.”

READ THE FULL INTERVIEW AT MUSIC TECHNOLOGY POLICY:
http://musictechpolicy.wordpress.com/2014/02/05/jean-michel-jarre-dont-forget-that-us-creators-are-the-smart-part-in-a-smartphone-by-helienne-lindvall/

NAMM 2014 Artists Rights Panel, Actually Features Artists…

We’ve written here before how so called “Artists Rights” or “Artists & Copyright” panels at conventions such as CES and SXSW seem to be lacking any artists who are actually interested in protecting their rights and copyrights. So we’re pleased to see that NAMM has gotten it right and we encourage those going to the convention to drop in on the panel.

NAMM 2014 – Copyright, The Internet and You
http://www.namm.org/thenammshow/2014/hot-zone/copyright-internet-and-you-panel

Day: Thursday, Jan 23

Start Time: 3:00 pm (One Hour) 

Room: The Forum (203 A-B)

Presenter / Moderator: Gregory Butler

Why are content creators seeing less money than ever while their art is being used so widely? Join our panel of experts as they look at the challenges of navigating the new music industry, piracy and intellectual property.

Panelists:
* Lucy Miyaki of Tashaki Miyaki
* Manda Mosher of Calico
* Reinhold Heil, Film & TV Composer
* John Cate, fmr Tunecore CFO
* Tom Biery, Artist Management
* Brian McNelis, Music Supervisor / Soundtrack Album Producer

Google Receives Its 100 Millionth Piracy Notice. Nothing Changes… | Digital Music News

“After 100 million piracy notices, it’s time for Google to take meaningful action to help curb online copyright infringement.

Google, with its market capitalisation of more than US$370 billion, is directing internet users to illegal sources of music.

This is not only harming a recording industry whose revenues have fallen by 40 percent in the last decade to US$16.5 billion, but it is also harming the more than 500 licensed digital music services worldwide that offer up to 30 million tracks to internet users.”

READ THE FULL STORY AT DIGITAL MUSIC NEWS:
http://www.digitalmusicnews.com/permalink/2014/01/14/googlereceives

RELATED:

Google, Advertising, Money and Piracy. A History of Wrongdoing Exposed.

 

Lou Reed and Dead Kennedys Go Public Against Ad Funded Piracy with Facebook Posts


How to DMCA : Google Web Search, De-Listing Infringing Links

 

 

UNSOUND : Zoe Keating Interview : Part 1 [VIDEO]

Zoe explains her background and how she became a DIY artist. She also explains how streaming services like Spotify don’t work out so well for independent artists.

 

 
RELATED:

Musicians POV : 1,000 True Fans (an answer)

If the Internet is working for Musicians, Why aren’t more Musicians Working Professionally?

Music Streaming Math, Can It All Add Up?

Internet Consultants Are Wrong : Confused About Musicians, The Internet and Piracy

There’s a post on a tech blog from 2009 following The Pirate Bay guilty verdict titled “Paul McCartney’s Confused About The Pirate Bay” that truly illustrates how many internet consultants and tech blogger’s appear feel about musicians. The  comments responding to Sir Paul McCartney speaking about the Pirate Bay verdict show just how much these people don’t seem to understand musicians.

In this one post we see all of the major anti-artists talking points that Silicon Valley interests still use against creators in a disinformation campaign that is over a decade long:

- artists are easily confused about the internet and technology
- artists don’t know what’s best for them (let the “consultant”  help you!)
- artists can get paid, but as long as its not via a “government mandated tax” ie, copyright (!?)
- artists shouldn’t be able to live off of one song (royalties), ie you must sing for your supper every night
- artists only ever made money from major label deals (which also seems to contradict labels don’t pay)
- the pirate bay (and the like) is just a tool for promotion that rewards artists who embrace it
- the pirate bay verdict of guilty was/is unfair

In the post Paul McCartney is accused of being confused about a verdict that sentenced four men to jail for operating a business that illegally distributed artists work, without compensation to the artists themselves. The Pirate Bay is a tool of exploitation against artists and Paul McCartney was not confused about this fact.

Let’s get a few things straight.

Piracy is NOT Promotion.

Exploitation is NOT Innovation.

Copyright is NOT Censorship.

In any value chain where the creators work is monetized, the creator should have the right to consent and the ability negotiate compensation. In a true free market either party can walk away if an agreement can not be reached. The Pirate Bay, however was and is an illegally operating business that does not respect the rights of individual artists.

We also find it interesting that the suggestions most frequently given to musicians to “get paid” in the internet era are actually all the same ways artists historically have gotten paid prior to the internet.

Here’s a brief recap of what these so called “business experts” and “internet technology consultants” see as the “new” models for artist compensation… Ready, set, go!

- Touring… existed BEFORE the internet

– Merchandise (T-Shirts)… existed BEFORE the internet

– Film/Sync Licensing… existed BEFORE the internet

– Sponsorships/Endorsements… existed BEFORE the internet

In conclusion, it appears that it is the tech bloggers and internet consultants who are confused about musicians, the internet and piracy. Musicians on the other hand seem to be very clear about these issues.

When it comes to issues of artists rights, we’d rather be with Paul McCartney.

RELATED:

EFF’s John Perry Barlow is Wrong, says Google’s Chief Economist

Larry Lessig is Wrong, and should “Get Over It”

“Artists Should Expect Nothing” from Spotify says George Howard