Golden Globe Winner Adele Exploited by American Express, AT&T, British Airways, Target and Nissan

On Sunday January 13th, Adele won the Golden Globe for the Best Song In a Motion Picture for her song “Skyfall” in the latest James Bond film of the same name. So we thought we’d take a look and see which brands are advertising on both the Golden Globes Awards Show and also on the pirate sites giving away the song that had just won the award.

It’s interesting to note who doesn’t show up on pirate sites as well. For example we’ve seen no ads by L’Oreal (as yet) on pirate sites. L’Oreal had a very strong presence running ads during the Golden Globes, as did Target (who unfortunately also shows up frequently on pirate sites).

Here’s what we found in just a few minutes… this is like shooting fish in a barrel. Who will advertise on the Academy Awards and Grammys who is also funding piracy? We wonder…

AdeleTargetMp3Ape

AdeleAT&T4shared

adeleamex4shared

adeleBristishAirmp3crow

AdeleKATbritAir

AdeleNissonmp3take

British Airways is interesting in this batch. Adele is British. James Bond is British. Have to wonder how smart these ad networks are getting in their targeting of consumers based on interests and other relational values.

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3 thoughts on “Golden Globe Winner Adele Exploited by American Express, AT&T, British Airways, Target and Nissan

  1. Pingback: Golden Globe Winner Adele Exploited by American Express, AT&T, British Airways, Target and Nissan | Stan Stewart's Blog

  2. I just stumbled upon this blog after checking in to David Lowery’s 300 Songs blog, which I hadn’t checked out in awhile. (He directs visitors to The Trichordist.)

    Forgive me if I’m confusing your views with David’s (or perhaps you are David), who seems adamantly opposed to Internet radio. I agree that P2P networks are parasitic (though there are some valid uses for P2P), but why the opposition to ‘Net radio?

    Today it was reported that Sound Exchange paid 58% more to recordings artists and labels in 2012 than it did in 2011 — royalties totaling more than $450 million. This, of course, came from Pandora, SiriusXM, and other ‘Net radio services.

    What am I missing here?

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