What if You Threw a Music Streaming Service Party and No One Showed up with Licenses? Google Play, Slacker, Tidal, Deezer, Beats, Microsoft and Rdio get Lawsuits

You’ve probably by now heard that Yesh Music LLC and John Emanuele have sued Tidal for Copyright infringement.   It is alleged that Tidal did not obtain the required licenses to stream the songs.  The facts in the case are similar to class actions filed against another streaming service (ahem).

Now there is a sort of salaciousness to a lawsuit against  Jay Z’s artist friendly streaming service Tidal,  thus this story has got a lot of play.   What is going unreported is that Yesh Music LLC  and the same law firm have also filed similar suits against Google Play, Slacker, Deezer, Rdio, Beats, and Microsoft.    Some of these have since been settled out of court.   But it’s clear what is happening here: streaming  services are using songs first and then going back and trying to exercise a compulsory license later.

ALL OF THEM.  

The law is absolutely clear on this matter.  You can not go back and try to obtain a compulsory license once you have already made songs available.

 

Deficient Backdated Rdio MRI notice

At the heart of all these lawsuits are deficient “Notices of Intent” like this one sent by Music Reports on behalf of Rdio.  I received this notice via the US postal service.  It is a highly misleading letter that purports to be a valid notice to execute a compulsory streaming license a full 4 months after the service made the song available! I have dozens of these deficient notices.  I’m not an attorney but the relevant section of the copyright act is incredibly clear on this matter: Rdio no longer has the right to license the song in this manner.  Music Reports  are in the business of licensing music for streaming services.  Surely they understand the law?  They reference the relevant section of the copyright act at the top of the letter!  How many thousands of these notices have they sent out via the US Postal Service  to songwriters all across the United States? 

 

 

 

3 thoughts on “What if You Threw a Music Streaming Service Party and No One Showed up with Licenses? Google Play, Slacker, Tidal, Deezer, Beats, Microsoft and Rdio get Lawsuits

  1. When I produced a cover album and sent out compulsory license notices, I had to do so BEFORE we ever recorded a note and sent product to radio. These streamers are thieves.

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