“MILLION A MONTH” TIM IS BACK WITH NEW IMPROVED PROFITEERING–BUT #IRESPECTMUSIC @THEBLAKEMORGAN FIGHTS BACK–AGAIN

[This post first appeared on MusicTechPolicy]

Sessions Cody Snow

You may have received an email from something called “Sessions” like this one above received by our friend Blake Morgan, and Blake wanted us to alert MTP readers. Here’s Blake’s reply:

Sessions Blake Reply copy

Who can forget the epic confrontation between Blake and “Million a Month” Tim Westergren during what Billboard called “World War P”, which shows what can happen when artist relations are grossly mismanaged.

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Why do we say “Million a Month” Tim?  Because that’s what he made from selling Pandora stock while poor mouthing about paying royalties from Pandora’s loss-making revenues.  It may not seem logical, but in Silicon Valley, they care far less about profit than they do about valuation because valuation is, as bank robber Willie Sutton said, where the money is. So “Million a Month” Tim was engaged in the gaslighting of all time.

 I guess Blake hasn’t forgotten.

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Of course in fairness, Daniel Ek and Spotify are running the same play on a much grander scale of international gaslighting as demonstrated by the COVID Misery Index. Big thanks to Blake for calling out another one and speaking truth to power.

COVID Misery Index 12-5-20
Comparison of post-pandemic stock trading of Spotify, Google, Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Live Nation

Guest Post @musictechpolicy: Another Bad Artist Relations Week for Spotify

By Chris Castle

Spotify released one of their groovy ad campaigns last week.  This time celebrating their freebie subscription campaign.

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You really do have to wonder where they find the people who come up with these things.

Blake Morgan, David Lowery and David Poe all laid into Spotify with their own tweets.  Just like Lowery’s seminal “Letter to Emily” post, but much faster, social media began driving traditional media with the story.

Billboard, Newsweek, Variety and New Music Express all picked up the story in 24 hours, and many others are also picking up the story.  I did a short post that Hypebot connecting the dots from the giveaway campaigns to user-centric royalties.

But the capper was the Godwin’s Law moment when Spotify’s lawyer and NYU professor Christopher Sprigman went after both Blake and David Lowery on Twitter for reasons that are frankly lost on me.  Professor Sprigman had something of a bizarre moment when he compared Lowery to Alex Jones which culminated in this exchange (recall that Alex Jones was deplatformed):

Sprigman 1

It should not be lost on anyone that Professor Sprigman supported Professor Lessig’s losing argument in the Eldred v. Ashcroftcase and apparently was co-counsel with Lessig in another losing argument in the Kahle v. Gonzalescase.  It also must be said that David Lowery and Melissa Ferrick’s class action against Sprigman client Spotify and Lowery’s case against Rhapsody were probably among the most consequential copyright cases (along with BMG v. Cox)  in the last five years.  Some would say that the Lowery cases set the table for the Music Modernization Act (and it should come as no surprise that David was asked to serve on one of the committees).

So while Professor Sprigman may find that Lowery “isn’t important”, there is a crucial difference between Professor Sprigman’s big copyright cases and David’s.  Want to guess what it is?

Some are speculating that Sprigman is retaliating on Blake and David Lowery for their successful commentary on his client Spotify–but I’d want to see a lot more proof.  Until then, you’d have to say Charlie has a point when he says that Sprigman is kind of an academic Bob Lefsetz.

Sprigman 2

And Spotify stumbles across the finish line of another bad media week of dissing artists.  Whew. Thank God it’s Monday, right?

Washington Turned a Deaf Ear to Artists’ Rights Until One Guy Wrote The Words “I Respect Music” on an Index Card and Showed It to the World | Digital Journal

The Washington beltway turned a deaf ear to artists’ rights until one guy, one activist, wrote the words “I Respect Music” on an index card and showed it to the world.

Now, thousands upon thousands of music makers and music lovers are standing together and making history by adding their names to a petition that is not only shaking up the music world, it’s shaking up Congress.

To sign the petition, please visit http://www.irespectmusic.org.
#irespectmusic

READ THE FULL STORY DIGITAL JOURNAL:
http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1729302

Blake Morgan Launches irespectmusic.org and #irespectmusic hashtag

Musician and artists rights advocate Blake Morgan has launched a new website, http://irespectmusic.org/ and the hashtag #irespectmusic

Blake is known not only for his music as a solo artist, and for the label he runs, ECR Music Group but also for his inspiring editorials on HuffPo:

Art and Music Are Professions Worth Fighting for

Pandora Needs to Do Right By Artists

We’re looking forward to seeing what he’s been up too…

BlakeIRespectMusic

RELATED:

Tim Westergren Emails Underscore Tension Between Pandora, Artists

Google, Advertising, Money and Piracy. A History of Wrongdoing Exposed.

Over 50 Major Brands Supporting Music Piracy, It’s Big Business!

Art and Music Are Professions Worth Fighting for | Blake Morgan HuffPo

In music specifically, 2013 has been a year unlike any other in recent memory. It’s been a year that has seen musicians stand up and speak out on behalf of their profession like never before. And the results have been historic. Internet radio giant Pandora has announced it’s abandoning its pursuit of legislation that would lower artists’ royalties. Congress is now taking another look at copyright reform. Spotify has responded to broad criticism and made their operations more transparent. And perhaps most significant, music lovers are now standing with music makers to help push these issues forward.

For the first time in a long time, there’s a lot to be hopeful about if you’re a musician. There are tremendous fights ahead, against powerful forces, on many fronts. But we have something those forces don’t have. We have something worth fighting for.

READ THE FULL POST AT HUFFPO:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/blake-morgan/post_6463_b_4461936.html

Intelligentsia Round-Up | Music Intelligentsia

New blog Music Intelligentsia digs into Music, Politics, Innovation. Dig In!

Fair Use by Google Books? Fair Use by GoldieBlox? Is copyright law being turned on its already-spinning head? Music Intelligentsia presents the commentary of 10 highly regarded experts regarding this important and controversial issue.

For quick reference, please use the links below to go directly to a particular commentary.

READ THE FULL POST AT MUSIC INTELLIGENTSIA:
http://musicintelligentsia.com/intelligentsia-round-up/

IN “HISTORIC MOMENT” FOR MUSIC, PANDORA STANDS DOWN | ECR

FROM ARTIST & ECR MUSIC GROUP FOUNDER BLAKE MORGAN:

BOWING TO PUBLIC PRESSURE, INTERNET RADIO GIANT ABANDONS LEGISLATION THAT WOULD LOWER MUSIC ROYALTIES

If you spoke up about this, if you posted about it on Facebook or Tweeted about it to your friends, if you added your voice to the courageous chorus who stood up and spoke out, you helped win this fight.

This victory belongs to you.

Onward. Yours, in music…

B

READ THE FULL POST FROM BLAKE MORGAN HERE:
http://us7.campaign-archive2.com/?u=80de27b3080b977742e48854f&id=96bee13002

Blake Morgan on Being a Musician, Pandora and Artists Rights (Video)

Guest post by Blake Morgan (copyright in the author)

Relativity Media and Google asked if I’d sit down and talk about my life in music, my new record, and the current battle being waged between musicians and Pandora that’s been garnering so many headlines. It was a terrific conversation that lasted almost two hours. Of course the piece they were looking to do was only going to be around five to eight minutes, and in the end it still turned out to be over 10 minutes long. But, there were a couple of points I felt were important beyond what was kept for the piece that I’d like to briefly underline here.

The first is that as big as the battle with Pandora is, the battle musicians are now saddled up for across the board is even bigger. Calling out Pandora on its unscrupulous double-talk to Congress and Wall Street, and fighting to get them to change their behavior is necessary and righteous. And I’m optimistic that in the long run that battle will get won. But we also have to keep our eyes on the prize: ending ad-funded piracy.

As long as the music world is bleeding revenue from the theft of our music (which in turn is sponsored by giant corporations that place ads right on the illegal download pages), the real problem won’t get solved. Our work, and our livelihoods will continue to be stolen right out from under us. Again, I’m optimistic, and I trust that we can focus on more than one righteous battle at a time. Both the important smaller one, and the over-reaching larger one.

Second, I wanted to just underline a whiff of good news in all this that I’ve been noticing. For the first time in this struggle, I’m seeing music lovers join music makers in our outrage. I’m getting letters and emails, messages, and tweets from music-loving people who are raising their own voices and saying, “I’m with you! I really understand this now…we want to get the music that matters to us, and we want you to get paid fairly.” I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had people tell me this, and it’s in stark contrast to what I’ve heard over the last ten years.

So I’m not hopeful in a vacuum…I believe the consciousness is changing, and that there’s a great foundation to build on. There’s so much work to do, and little time to do it if we’re going to save the young musicians out there who are hoping in turn to be musicians as their profession.

You can’t wring your hands and roll up your sleeves at the same time.

Let’s win these fights. Let’s get to work.

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RELATED:
Pandora Tries to Convince a Musician That He Isn’t Getting Screwed…