New Adventures in Copyright Enforcement @SXSW #SXSW

Friday, March 14 | 2:00PM – 3:00PM
New Adventures in Copyright Enforcement
Austin Convention Center | Room 17B | 500 E Cesar Chavez St

lthough debates about how to protect copyright online might seem so 2010, they certainly haven’t abated. The current conversations aren’t as contentious as the SOPA skirmishes, but that doesn’t necessarily mean consensus. Current attempts to address piracy are taking place outside of Congress, and include efforts to establish “best practices” between stakeholders. From the recently-minted Copyright Alert System to voluntary agreements meant to curb unauthorized activity within ad networks and payment processors, new experiments in rights protection abound. What’s the thinking behind the various approaches? What does a “win” look like, and what are the parameters for oversight? How can artists get involved?

MMODERATOR
Casey Rae
Interim Exec Dir – Future of Music Coalition

Sherwin Siy
VP, Legal Affairs- Public Knowledge

Jill Lesser
Exec Dir- Center For Copyright Information

David Lowery
Musician/Internet Content Provider – Cracker

Eyesight to the Willfully Blind: Five Things That ISPs Can Do Today to Stop Ripping Off Artists

We are still waiting for the launch of the vaunted “Copyright Alert System” which was supposed to be up and running this month (July 2012).  Now we are hearing October.  You know what we think?  We think the ISPs have bullshitted their way through another year of profiting from human misery.

We have heard just about enough from ISPs who perpetuate blatant theft online hiding behind a variety of hollow excuses—when ISPs clearly know that they profit more from theft and are in a better position to stop it than anyone else with their snout in the digital trough.  This started with ISPs benefiting from broadband penetration largely stoked by massive digital theft, willfully ignoring repeat infringers and now using the public mobile spectrum to snort down unlicensed works.

Here’s a few ideas for ISPs—but it starts with a basic suggestion.  Go to the mirror.  However you want to try to slither out of responsibility this time, take a good look at your lying face and ask yourself if you are proud of what you are doing.

1.  Stop marketing your services to encourage theft from artists.  Fast download speeds don’t have to be measured in how many movies or recordings your users can download—they can figure that out, too.

2.  Respond to repeat infringer requests quickly—you know that the DMCA you love so much does not require a full blown federal jury trial on a link by link basis before a track is infringing.

3.  Stop bullying artists who send you notices.  Your lawyers try to scare artists by threatening to bring your big boy litigation budget down on the head of an artist who’s doing good to make the poverty line when they complain about being ripped off.  And you’re surprised that we have a problem with you?

4.  Get serious about piracy.   Stop advertising on pirate sites and commit to reducing piracy by 10% a year on your networks.  We don’t need to follow the money through some black box designed to make it hard.  We know why your ads never seem to appear on porn sites—someone will get fired if they do.  But obviously, no one gets fired when your ads appear on pirate sites because more traffic helps you sell broadband.

5.  We’re going to give you the same advice we give others who profit themselves by screwing artists—give some back.  You could put 1% of your profits into arts education and health services for artists, you’ve definitely made way more than that in the biggest income transfer of all time.  You want our music, movies, books, newspapers, photographs and illustrations for your “legitimate” services?  Do the right thing.

The Trichordist Random Reader Weekly News & Links Sun Jul 8

Grab the Coffee!

Here’s how the internet and tech industry are getting one step closer to dismantling copyright. Essential reading for all creators By Andrew Orlowski from The Register UK:
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/07/02/govt_copyright_white_paper/

Radiohead would not exist without early major label funding and another band like them may never have the opportunity to ever exist again. Mike Doughty posts:
http://mkdo.co/post/26352263455/radiohead-wouldnt-exist-without-early-major-label

The High Price Of Free Music – How Illegal Downloads are Silencing Artists, Daily Finance Reports:
http://www.dailyfinance.com/2012/07/05/the-high-price-of-free-music-how-illegal-downloads-are-silencin/

TrustMeImAScientist breaks down the math on Amanda Palmer’s Kickstarter:
http://trustmeimascientist.com/2012/06/04/how-to-release-an-album-in-the-21st-century/

UPDATE: A look at how the numbers really look from Spotify, Music Tech Policy Reports:
http://musictechpolicy.wordpress.com/2012/07/01/how-much-do-artists-earn-online/

Why Spotify doesn’t make sense for musicians, The Atlantic Reports:
http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/06/why-spotify-doesnt-make-sense-for-musicians-70-000-listens-earns-less-than-300/259136/

The ongoing saga of The Oatmeal Vs. FunnyJunk continues, we love Matt Innman. Ars Technica reports:
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2012/07/the-oatmeal-fights-backs-snaps-photo-of-cash-sends-money-to-charity/

UPDATE: Grooveshark V Digital Music News, Digital Music News Reports:
http://www.digitalmusicnews.com/permalink/2012/120703grooveshark

Time Magazine reports on the pending Six Strikes Policy for US ISPs and the Center For Copyright Information :
http://business.time.com/2012/06/26/coming-soon-a-softer-approach-to-online-piracy/

Twitter maintains that users “own” their own tweets. Be nice if artists were allowed to own their own songs. Skip to end, The New York Times reports:
http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/02/judge-orders-twitter-to-release-protesters-messages/

The Village Voice summarizes “All Of The Arguments About Digital Music”… sorta…
http://blogs.villagevoice.com/music/2012/06/digital_music_arguments.php

Artists Rights are not limited to issues online as Digital Music News reports:
http://www.digitalmusicnews.com/permalink/2012/120703bilking#xLkYNVy-O58Cm-EjK0MCFw

Several artists rights groups responded with links – we’d love to hear from musicians about these Organizations:
http://www.fairtrademusicpdx.org/
http://www.SeattleMusicians.org
http://www.venuology.com/