@theBlakeMorgan Joins the List Opposing Frozen Mechanicals at the Copyright Royalty Board #irespectmusic

Blake Morgan songwriter, publisher, producer and label owner, two-time U.S. Supreme Court amicus, founder of the #irespectmusic campaign and relentless artist rights advocate joins the list opposing frozen mechanicals on vinyl and physical. “This is about so many things, but we simply must fight to keep digging out from a 68 year injustice. Big thanks to the inspirational Abby North for standing up for fairness and transparency!”

BlakeIRespectMusic

Against Frozen MechanicalsSupporting Frozen Mechanicals
Songwriters Guild of AmericaNational Music Publishers Association
Society of Composers and LyricistsNashville Songwriters Association International
Alliance for Women Film Composers 
Songwriters Association of Canada 
Screen Composers Guild of Canada 
Music Creators North America 
Music Answers 
Alliance of Latin American Composers & Authors 
Asia-Pacific Music Creators Alliance 
European Composers and Songwriters Alliance 
Pan African Composers and Songwriters Alliance 
North Music Group 
Blake Morgan 

@KayHanley Reaction to @NorthMusicGroup Letter to Congress on Frozen Mechanicals and Copyright Royalty Board

@NorthMusicGroup Letter to Congress on Frozen Mechanicals and the Copyright Royalty Board

May 13, 2021 – By Email

Senator Dianne Feinstein                                           Senator Alex Padilla
United States Senate                                                  United States Senate
331 Hart Senate Office Building                                 B03 Russell Senate Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20510                                             Washington, D.C. 2010

Re: Potential Settlement of Mechanical Royalty Rates in CRB Phonorecords IV  

Dear Senators Feinstein and Padilla:

I am a California-based music publisher.

I’m writing to you to express my concern regarding the private party settlement submitted to the Copyright Royalty Board by the NMPA, NSAI, UMG, WMG and SME related to the Phonorecords IV physical and download mechanical rate.

My father-in-law was the composer and songwriter, Alex North. Alex worked for years, crafting scores to Hollywood feature films, and writing songs to accompany picture.

In 2015, Alex’s score to A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE was added to the Library of Congress’ National Registry, as a recognition of the music’s importance as part of the fabric of United States arts and culture.

Alex composed the score to a 1955 film entitled UNCHAINED. The theme to that film became the melody to the song “Unchained Melody,” with the lyric written by Hy Zaret.

“Unchained Melody” has been recorded by thousands of artists, in all styles and genres. The lyric has been adapted to at least 20 different languages. “Unchained Melody” is among the most popular wedding songs of all time. Listeners still download recordings of “Unchained Melody.” They still buy CDs and vinyl releases.

I am the music publishing administrator of  “Unchained Melody,” on behalf of my family and the Zaret family. I also administer over one hundred thousand other copyrights on behalf of legacy songwriters and their families, and on behalf of current songwriters and composers.

Songwriters struggle to earn a living wage. With the advent of digital streaming, physical and download sales have certainly declined. However, they have absolutely not disappeared. Anybody who says this royalty stream does not matter is simply not telling the truth.

The royalty amount for the digital stream of a song is a micropenny. Unless it is a top songwriter with hundreds of millions to billions of streams, there is an excellent chance that songwriter still may be driving Uber to support herself and her family.

It takes hundreds of streams of a recording to equal the 9.1 cent mechanical publishers receive for a physical sale or download. That’s why this physical and download mechanical rate is so important.

Vinyl sales are strong for many retailers including Amazon and Best Buy. CDs remain a significant media format, and many listeners still prefer to “own” rather than temporarily cache the music they listen to.

Increasing the statutory mechanical rate to simply adjust for inflation will dramatically (and positively) effect songwriters’ and publishers’ bottom lines. This fight is akin to the battle for an increased minimum wage.

Major music publishers do not face the same struggles as independent publishers and songwriters. Major publishers are part of multi-national conglomerates that own both the major publishers and major record labels. Major publishers that agree to fix the statutory rate simply are leaving more money in the pockets of the labels that are their sister companies.

Those of us that do not have sister companies have no such opportunity. That’s why we must fight to be heard.

Each quarter, I process statements from approximately 100 domestic and global sources, many of which include mechanical royalties for physical and download media. Each quarter, I make distributions to the multiple families that are heirs to, and owners of these copyrights. Songwriters and their families depend on royalties for food, mortgages, education and more.

From the initial publication of “Unchained Melody” in 1955 through 2005 (approximately 50 years!), the statutory mechanical rate was fixed at 2 cents. Starting in 1977, the mechanical royalty incrementally increased from 2¢ to 9.1¢ per unit until 2006.  But since 2006, the statutory rate again was frozen and remains so.  The private settlement would extend that freeze until 2027.

I ask that you review the Copyright Royalty Board practices and consider allowing songwriters and independent publishers – who do not speak through trade organizations or major multi-national corporations — to voice their concerns through public comments that the CRB takes into account before it makes its final decision.

Best, 

Abby North

@NorthMusicGroup Joins the List Opposing Frozen Mechanicals With the Copyright Royalty Board

We’ve been keeping track of those who are for freezing the statutory mechanical royalty rate for physical and permanent downloads for another five years out to 2027. The issue is currently part of the rate setting proceeding before the Copyright Royalty Board–which froze the same rate at 9.1¢ in 2006 and was first extended in 2009.

Frozen Mechanicals

Here is the current list of those for and against freezing mechanicals on these categories for a total of 21 years:

Against Frozen MechanicalsSupporting Frozen Mechanicals
Songwriters Guild of AmericaNational Music Publishers Association
Society of Composers and LyricistsNashville Songwriters Association International
Alliance for Women Film Composers 
Songwriters Association of Canada 
Screen Composers Guild of Canada 
Music Creators North America 
Music Answers 
Alliance of Latin American Composers & Authors 
Asia-Pacific Music Creators Alliance 
European Composers and Songwriters Alliance 
Pan African Composers and Songwriters Alliance 
North Music Group 

Copyright Royalty Board Responds to Coalition of Songwriter Groups on Frozen Mechanicals

A group of songwriter organizations from around the world wrote to the Copyright Royalty Board last week opposing a proposed private “settlement” between the major labels and the major publishers to freeze mechanical rates on physical and downloads at the 9.1¢ 2006 rate that was filed in the current Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) rate court hearing called “Phonorecords IV”. (You can find the entire list of filings in the case here.)

The twist here is that if the CRB approves the private settlement at the request of “the parties” and doesn’t take into account the views and evidence of people who actually write songs and have to earn a living from songwriting, it will be grotesquely unfair and possibly unconstitutional wage and price control. The CRB will have frozen the mechanical rate for physical and downloads at the 2006 rate when inflation alone has eaten away the buying power of that royalty by approximately 30%. This would be like the Minerals Management Service adopting a settlement written by Exxon.

On average–on average–the physical and download configuration make up 15% of billing for the majors and for some artists vinyl is a welcome change from fractions of a penny on streaming. And then there’s Record Store Day–hello? These are a couple of the many reasons anyone who is paying attention should reject the terms of the settlement.

US Revenue by Source 2020

The Coalition had a simple ask: Let the public comment:

In the interests of justice and fairness, we respectfully implore the CRB to adopt and publicize a period and opportunity for public comment on the record in these and other proceedings,especially in regard to so-called proposed “industry settlements” in which creators and other interested parties have had no opportunity to meaningfully participate prior to their presentation to the CRB for consideration, modification or rejection. In the present case, hundreds of millions of dollars of our future royalties remain at stake, even in a diminished market for traditional, mechanical uses of music. To preclude our ability to comment on proposals that ultimately impact our incomes, our careers, and our families, simply isn’t fair.

The Copyright Royalty Board responded! According to our sources, the Copyright Royalty Board said that they would publish the private settlement in the Federal Register and give the pubic the chance to comment. This is great news!

But we will see what they actually do. The Copyright Royalty Board does not have a great track record in understanding songwriter interests in raising the mechanical rates as we can see in this except from their final rule freezing mechanicals again in 2009:

Copyright Owners’ argument with respect to this objective is that songwriters and music publishers rely on mechanical royalties and both have suffered from the decline in mechanical income. Under the current rate, they contend, songwriters have difficulty supporting themselves and their families. As one songwriter witness explained, “The vast majority of professional songwriters live a perilous existence.” [Rick] Carnes [Testimony] at 3. [Rick Carnes signed the Coalition letter as President of the Songwriters Guild of America.] We acknowledge that the songwriting occupation is financially tenuous for many songwriters. However, the reasons for this are many and include the inability of a songwriter to continue to generate revenue-producing songs, competing obligations both professional and personal, the current structure of the music industry, and piracy. The mechanical rates alone neither can nor should seek to address all of these issues.

We simply do not accept that the Founders put the Copyright Clause in the Constitution so creators could have a side hustle for their Uber driving which is exactly where frozen mechanicals take you, particularly after the structural unemployment in the music business caused by the COVID lockdowns.

Here is a summary of who is for and who is against frozen mechanicals.

Against Frozen MechanicalsProposing Frozen Mechanicals
Songwriters Guild of AmericaNational Music Publishers Association
Society of Composers and LyricistsNashville Songwriters Association International
Alliance for Women Film Composers 
Songwriters Association of Canada 
Screen Composers Guild of Canada 
Music Creators North America 
Music Answers 
Alliance of Latin American Composers & Authors 
Asia-Pacific Music Creators Alliance 
European Composers and Songwriters Alliance 
Pan African Composers and Songwriters Alliance 

Which side are you on? If you want to write your own comment to the Copyright Royalty Board about frozen mechanicals, send your comment to crb@loc.gov